Supporting Schoolyard Pedagogy in Elementary Methods Courses

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Feille, K. & Hathcock, S. (2021). Supporting schoolyard pedagogy in elementary methods courses. Innovations in Science Teacher Education, 6(1). Retrieved from https://innovations.theaste.org/supporting-schoolyard-pedagogy-in-elementary-methods-courses/

by Kelly Feille, University of Oklahoma; & Stephanie Hathcock, Oklahoma State University

Abstract

Schoolyard pedagogy illustrates the theories, methods, and practices of teaching that extend beyond the four walls of a classroom and capitalize on the teaching tools available in the surrounding schoolyard. In this article, we describe the schoolyard pedagogy framework, which includes intense pedagogical experiences, opportunities and frequent access, and continuous support. We then provide an overview of how we are intentionally working toward developing schoolyard pedagogy in elementary preservice teachers at two universities. This includes providing collaborative experiences in the university schoolyard and nearby schools, individual experiences in nature, opportunities to see the possibilities in local schoolyards, and lesson planning that utilizes the schoolyard. We also discuss potential barriers and catalysts for schoolyard pedagogy during the induction years, future needs, and potential for continuous support.

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